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May. 24th, 2010

Summer Tour: Swell! (but sweaty)

Howdy Yall!

Greetings from the road. As Bilbo Baggins said "You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to." Well, we've step out our door and the generous donations of our supporters have swept us off to the Midwest. With just enough funds for fuel to the Girl Scouts event, the desperately needed mechanical fix, and AAA RV+ (a dangerous thing to be without on the road in a 36-foot vehicle) the intrepid Permibus Crew set out on their last family Summer Skills Tour (for this incarnation at least).

The drive out was long and the days just before packed with business. Summer hit hard somewhere around Eastern Montana/Western North Dakota. A couple Walmart parking lot nights and over 450 miles saw us in St. Cloud, MN Saturday morning on our war to a Green Fair. The Girl Scouts Green Fair event was wonderful. Wind made a rodeo of the big top and our hostess' impeccable music tasted led to some wonderful live music for dancing throughout the day. Stan even won one of the raffle prizes which included a bunch of seeds, a hand trowel and a pair of gardening gloves.

The days out here in the Midwest are proving entirely too hot and sticky for this early in the summer. Todays high is 92`F and proving breezier than yesterday 94`F. Sweat aside however, we are finding the company and local swell as can be. This evening we'll be getting our hands in cool soil with some local friends and tomorrow we mosey on down the road. Madison beckons on the horizon with Stan's long-lost high-school best-friend as a midpoint stop off for sleep, socialization and showers.

Then Thursday we get to pick up Lorca from the airport so she can join us for the remainder of Summer Tour!

The rest will be written in the future and I will abstain from the obvious apologies about my unreliable blogging habits as I'm sure you've learned them by now.

Until next time!

Be Well,
-Megan Coyote

"The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say"


Keep that bus a rollin'!
Donate now by visiting our website www.permibus.org

Mar. 27th, 2010

Permibus, paining

Hello again from Noah, Intern!

Hey Fellow Permis!

This is Noah Kindfield aka Hippie Boy, two-time Permi-Bus intern. Yall might remember me, I was the first ever Permi-Bus intern back in the Summer of 2008. When I learned that the Permi-Bus was coming back to my native Bio-Region of the Cumberland Basin conventionaly referred to as Midle Tennessee, needless to say i was exited. I have always felt a connection to the DogFolk collective/family that serve as the maintainers and trainers of what the Permi-Bus has to offer and, the bus itself. This connection has always been one of spontinuity. And as is inherent is spontinuity here i sit 1485 miles away from the permi-bus medic training in Nashville, TN half way into my second gont into the mystical abord puddle jumping, dimension defying Permi-Bus.
As I may have explained in previous blogs, i have since birth lived a life jampacked with lessons and new experiances. In 1992 I was born in Berkely, California to two freshly PHDed originaly northeastern hippies. Three years after my birth my parents decided it was time to move so we drove acrooss the country to New Jersey were my dad had a job at City Collage of New York and my mom and found work developing SAT questions at SAT Headquerters Montclaire, NJ. As you can gather by my parents prefessions i was constintley being taught things this is something i whould come to hate and later appriciate. After nine years of being the radicals of our little new jersey town and a failed attepmt to create a charter school for my father to impliment his curiculem we as a family decided to move to a small community in Tennessee called, The Farm (LINK). On the farm my father whould become the director of The Farm School (www.thefarmschool.tv) along with becoming a full member of the farm and a member of the board of directors which is the self governing body of the farm. My mother whoul find employment at varrious universitys. These years spent on the farm whould lead to explore permaculture, liveing in community, following various bands around the coutry festivaling and activism (these were all parts of my life prior ro the farm but the farm lead to morwe in depth exploration). I have recently graduated from the Farm School and intend on going to collage in oregon next year for Education so that i may eventually follow in the footsteps of my father and direct The Farm School.
It was on the Farm that i was first introduced to the permi-bus. The farm school was playing host and in a typical fashion i was late getting back to school after lunch so i missed half the puppit show. After the puppit show the school got a our of the bus and i was captivated. Before the sun rose the next day i was to join the permi bus crew ,after i finished my sophmore year, in syracuse. My first intership was probly the most densly packed learning experiance ive ever had.
Jump to two weeks ago. The medic training in Nashville has been concluded the collective is meeting and then they ask me if I want to jouin them for the Spring Tour of the rockey mountin West. I exuberantley accepted. As we hightailed it across Tennessee followed by Missori followed by Kansas I earned a new understanding of the J.R.R Tolkin quote, "Not all who wander, are lost." The sights of the mountains and the general landscape harkened back to my first croos country road trip.
My first stop of my second Permi-bus interenship was at the 63ed St. Farm of Boulder, CO (http://www.63rdstfarm.com/63st_Farm_Boulder_CO/Welcome.html). We stay at the 63ed Street Farm for the next four days leading up to our training at a local mobile home village. When we arrived at the sight of our training our host, Sandy Cruz of Transition Colarado, took the DogFolk out for dinner. This left me alone with the bus to talk to the local youth who showed a great intrest in the chickens and in the fact that we all LIVE on the the bus. Everybody got back from dinner and the training was underway. Our host made an interesting point that they had failed to raise any intrest from the mobile home village in any of there past events but when we pulled up in our bus and set out the chickens the whole neiberhood came out to see what was up with the Permi-Bus!
The mourning after our event in boulder we headed for happy heart farms in Fort Collins, Colorado. We went to Fort Collins because we had got invited to volunter and attend a lunchen and and speach by Farmer/Food Freedom Advacote Joel Salatin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joel_Salatin) . Salatin is a self proclamied Christian Capitlist Libratarian Envirmentalist Lunatic he has a farm in Virginia called Polyface Farms (http://www.polyfacefarms.com/). He has achived more recent fame through his food freedom addvacocy books which include Salad Bar Beef, Pastured Poultry Profit$, You Can Farm, Family Friendly Farming, Holy Cows And Hog Heaven and Everything I Want To Do Is Illegal: War Stories From the Local Food Front. He also appers in the films Food Inc., Fresh and Farmageddon all of this books and films are highley recomended by the Permi-Bus Crew. His presontation was well attened. His main talking points were the illigalztion of the local farmer and what we can do to change that.
Following our days in Fort Collins we headed for Riverton, Wyoming. as we entered Wyoming the saying Wyoming Like No Place On Earth began to make more sense to me. The landscape is so odd due to southern wyomings location near the yellowstone caldara. We arrived in Riverton ate a wonderful elk dinner. And here i sit. Till next time.

Much Love,
Proud Permi Noah Kindfield aka Hippie Boy


Keep that bus a rollin'! To donate go to www.permibus.com and click 'Donate Now'!


You can read my posts from the last bus ride at by following the following links:
http://permibus.livejournal.com/7555.html
http://permibus.livejournal.com/7856.html
http://permibus.livejournal.com/8862.html
http://permibus.livejournal.com/9075.html

Mar. 24th, 2010

More Tales From The Road

Captain’s Blog
3/13/2010,
3/24/2010
Murfreesboro, TN.,
Riverton, WY.


From Atlanta the Permibus crew traveled to Nashville, TN. Megan and Delyla put on a three-day Community Health training that featured a permaculture element, using permaculture to respond to emergency conditions. That was a lot of fun. It was the first time I’d taught the subject and it proved a challenge. Permaculture is of course a good way of responding to emergencies while empowering communities. Our host, the Little Hamilton Collective was friendly, helpful, and a lot of fun.

While Megan and Delyla taught on Saturday I took the opportunity to meet Seiwaz, Nashville’s prophet of Permaculture. Seiwaz has been involved with Permaculture since the late 1990’s and has made a real impact with Nashville’s low-income folks. Seiwaz took me to the annual Lawn and Garden show, an event of the type I normally try to avoid. In Nashville however the show featured displays, workshops, and other presentations on lasagna composting, turning trash to treasure, greywater, and rain water catchment. It felt really good to see so much permaculture at such a straight event.

Seiwaz is in the middle of teaching his eight-week PDC so it was great of him to take time to show me around and introduce me to Nashville’s dynamic permi-community. We went to the inner city garden Seiwaz works with for a chicken presentation and a garden tour. The garden proved amazing, almost as amazing as the energetic crew of permi's who love and tend it. To Seiwaz permaculture is a spiritual as well as physical labor of love. It is also the only true way to build vibrant communities of abundance. Seiwaz is truly on fire with permaculture and has lit fires across a diversity of Nashville communities.

After Nashville we took a few days in Murfreesborro to rest and pick up Noah. Noah has the distinction of being our first intern. He is back with us for a short spring tour. We drove hard across the Great plains and headed to Colorado in time for the snow and Joel Salatin. Giving permaculture presentations in Colorado is special to me as Colorado is the familial home. In Boulder and FT. Collins we found folks alive with permaculture. Brian at the 63erd Street Farm in Boulder was especially inspirational. The whole permi crew proved a real kick in the energy box.

I'd only read a few articles by Joel Salatin and really wasn't sure what to expect. The man is a true American radical, a cross between Abbie hoffman and Sam Adams. His vision of a truly free nation took me back to my much younger hippie days when I sought those prophets of true freedom. Damn the government and the corporations, it's us citizens who will take back our food, and our rights.

We're in Wyoming now resting before we make our way back to Montana and dig into what is shaping up to be a busy, and fruitful summer.
Donate On-line:
Go to: www.permibus.org
Click on: Donate

Donate by Mail:
Make checks payable to:
Delyla Wilson.
Send to :
150 Daly Ave.
Hamilton, MT. 59840


“Teaching Revolutionary Ways Of Living…”
Captain but not leader,
Stan Wilson
Permi Preacher,
Infrastructure Coordinator
Skills Tour.
permipreacher@gmail.com
www.permibus.org

Mar. 2nd, 2010

The Road Goes On...

Captain’s Blog
2/28/10
Atlanta, Ga.

The time has come to leave Koinonia and venture forth into the world. Koinonia is a place that is hard to leave. The love and care the folks extend to their guest is something so rarely found. The folks at Koinonia truly care and it shows in the hospitality they happily and openly grant those of us who make our way to rural South Georgia. The road has called however and there
is work to be done.

From Koinonia we have come to Atlanta for the Permaculture Faire. Once again it is invigorating to be on the road spreading the word of permaculture to folks who are actively seeking new models on which to design our society. After just a day I have become convinced that creating communities based upon permaculture ethics and principals is to create communities of sustainable abundance.

Our own experiment continues to be tinkered with. If permaculture teaches anything it is that the model is always subject to change. We seek sustainability and the question remains as how to do that. We have ideas but no answers yet.

Money is always an issue and we recently discovered that our business sponsor has opted out of further support. This has left us scrambling to replace a substantial amount. Your continued support is vitally important now. Information on how to donate follows below. Right now I don’t know how the tour will change but it will. I do know that this work in whatever forum is more important now than ever before. As a culture we sit with an opportunity to create major paradigm shifts. Changes towards sustainable abundance in our culture will create ripples of deep change throughout our entire world. Nothing but good can come of it.

From Atlanta we will go to Nashville then west. We are on our way home to Montana. It is there that we will confront the changes the tour seems to need to make. Our summer is already planned. It will be an exciting time and more on that will follow.

For now the end of another evening has come. We are in Atlanta amongst friends. Spending the day talking about permaculture has wet my appetite for more. Now I will say goodnight. I hope to meet some of you on the road.


Donate On-line:
Go to: www.permibus.org
Click on: Donate

Donate by Mail:
Make checks payable to:
Delyla Wilson.
Send to :
150 Daly Ave.
Hamilton, MT. 59840


“Teaching Revolutionary Ways Of Living…”
Captain but not leader,
Stan Wilson
Permi Preacher,
Infrastructure Coordinator
Skills Tour.
permipreacher@gmail.com
www.permibus.org

Feb. 9th, 2010

Prayers, Pigs & Pecans

I woke up this morning at 8:58 crawled from my twin mattress raised on palates inside my little orange tent and greeted the morning sun and clouds with some unintended partial nudity and a yawn. I then got dressed in the bus, snagged a bite of caramel and a glass of water, and headed the several hundred feet to Pecan Plant 3: Sorting here on Koinonia where my days work began. I donned my hairnet, white plastic apron, and latex gloves before entering the work room where 3 long tabled sorting machines take up most of a medium sized room. There I sat pulling amber's and trash from an ever moving line of fresh Georgia grown pecans, all the while listening to the musical chatter of all the old southern black women (understanding very little of it). All in all not a bad way to spend time. Then came lunch-time and I came back to the bus to check on Elly May, the (now) 4-day old piglet with a 2x2x2 inch triangle of flesh missing from her left shoulder. The flap of skin we had stitched on when the injury happened was not attaching and the flesh beneath it had started to rot despite regular cleaning with Betadine/oregon grape root flushes and oregon grape root internally. That meant it was time for surgery #2. We had just gotten everything clean and set up when the baby pig decided to have the shits. This adventure continued for almost a 1/2 hour and then we finally had her down on the table. A little burn cream on the wound (it contains the numbing agent Lidocaine) followed by some injectable Lidocaine and we were cutting the stitches and peeling up the traingle of dead skin to real the rotting shoulder underneath. A fair amount of scalpel work, lots and lots and lots of cleaning, 2-stitched and an hour of continuous squealing and struggling from miss Elly May later and we were ready to bandage her up.

Elly May is tottering around the bus right now with her Medihoney bandage on. After the surgery we gave her back end a bath, put a warm meal of milk, molasses, oregon grape root tincture, and acidophilus, and she took a long nap. It was pretty stressful for all involved and I hope to be assuaging my psyche with 24 season 7 before too long.

Be Well All,
-Megan Coyote

Feb. 3rd, 2010

Post-Cold Politics

After over a month buried in severe winter conditions with limited access to everything the Permibus finally broke free yesterday. We caught up on a little shopping and now find ourselves sitting in a Travel America in South Carolina listening to truckers and local rednecks talk politics. I am always pleased to hear the “average” working class red state American talk politics and today is no exception. It reminds me that the “liberal left” not only do not have a monopoly on political understanding but that they are often behind the game still believing in party politics. During the election so much was said amongst the liberal community about how Obama would save this country. However, here in the truck stop in Duncan, SC the overweight, “ignorant” rednecks clearly understand what the issues are.

The conversation started with a discussion of the US response to the Haiti earthquake. All three questioned why the US would be sending millions of dollars to Haiti. Their concerns were not based on isolationist politics but that there are still many people in New Orleans and the surrounding area that did not have homes. One of the group expressed that our government should be assisting those folks instead of sending money to Haiti. This, of course, lead to a discussion of how much funding the US government has already dumped into Katrina and how much of it was used to line the pocket of the wealthy.

Once the discussion of government spending was on the table the conversation quickly turned to the budget deficit and government spending. This led to a moment of Obama bashing in regards to his economic policies and the ever-growing deficit. Immediately someone pointed out that Obama inherited Bush’s mess and that the growing deficit was a result of the previous administration. This led to a short-lived discussion between several members of the group on whether Republicans were better than Democrats before someone else pointed out that there is really no difference between the two parties. As she put it, there may be two heads on the dragon but “once you get past the heads there is only one body and one asshole cause it’s all the same beast.” This brought nods of agreement all around and a general agreement that the problem with party politics is that people vote the party ticket instead of for the person.

With party lines removed from the discussion once again the focus became the economy and what ails it from a rednecks perspective. Their truck stop political analysis summarized the history of neoconservative globalization succinctly. “This all started when Clinton signed who signed NAFTA trade agreements that started shipping our of the country.” “No, it started with Reagan who put the first free trade agreements in place” “No, it started when Nixon went to China and started that whole open door policy.”

Yep, even the rednecks hanging out in truck stops know that the root of our economic problem is this whole free trade policy that allows the United States to export jobs in order to use fundamentally slave labor, (actually slave owners were expected to offer at least substandard food and housing to their workers however corporations are under no such expectation) to produce the tools and toys of America. The truck stop crowd understands that it doesn’t matter if it is Bush, Obama, Clinton, or Reagan in office. Whether they call themselves a Democrat or Republican, all of them are ready and willing to sell the future of this country’s people to the highest bidder.

Jan. 12th, 2010

Winter (wonder) Land!

Howdy Yall!

After long days on the road and so much talking, talking, talking the intrepid Permibus crew was more than ready for a month on a N. Carolina mountain. A quiet holiday, Italian Solstice dinner party and some grant writing was the perfect speed for us. Then came the storms. Like everywhere N. Carolina was hit harder than usual. The hip-deep snow hadn't stuck for more than a week in over 15years and most considered it the worst winter in 2 decades. The bus was quickly trapped and with the on-land water frozen we we're in for the rugged.

In some ways it was a perfect way to spend the winter. We chopped wood, melted snow for water, and tried to insulate against the howling 30+ mph winds. Freezing rain added layers of ice on everything and the bus became a postcard. Icicles hung from roof to ground around the bus and shimmering white snow blanketed our world. The holiday party had to be canceled due to the snow drenched drive and instead we got to spend christmas by candlelight playing games and spending quality time with just the 3 of us. Treacherous and hard but classically beautiful encapsulates the end of our December.

As January began it was more then time to leave however. Everything we needed to do to survive was getting painful on cold joints and our usually packed larder was finally getting empty and the digging began. At last we waited for a few clear and melty days in the freezing cold and tried to turn the bus around. The power cord had been chipped out of the drive, the wood was packed, the bus was battened, tons of snow had been moved and we blew it. Not enough traction to turn around much less get up the driveway. The next morning we called in a tow truck driver through our AAA RV+ (an absolute godsend) and he showed up with a little truck and some mad wenching skills. It was epic. The bus ended up being half-driven, half-wenched backwards up the long hilly, icy driveway. With dad manning the drivers post our hearts kept leaping into our throats as the bus would slide sideways towards the ravine and its own destruction.

Several near heart-attacks later the magical tow man had gotten us to the top and turned around. At last, we were free! Off we went on our merry way. The bus is now nestled warmly at Koinonia in Georgia and I am visited our loving friends up in Long Island. After so long so trapped I needed some time away but am looking forward to getting myself back down to Georgia to sort some pecans and get back into the Skills Tour groove.

Be Well,
-Megan Coyote

Outreach Coordinator
Skills Tour
skillsmc@gmail.com
406-544-2767
www.permibus.org

Keep that bus a rollin'! Donate now online at our website www.permibus.org!

Dec. 12th, 2009

End Of The Year

Captain’s Blog
12/11/09
West Jefferson, N.C.

You the reader will have to excuse the Captain’s tardiness in blogging. A very busy year has come to a close and the Permi crew is taking a much needed and well-deserved rest here in the beautiful Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. The end of our year found us very busy in the Washington DC area. Not only did we work a lot but our brought us into contact with folks that we don’t generally get a chance to work with. In DC and later, in Ashville, North Carolina we brought Permaculture to inner city audiences.

Often programs about sustainable living rarely reach low income and communities of color. Many factors play into these communities lack of exposure. Permaculture is nearly unheard of. It has able been part of the Skills Tour philosophy to bring information to such groups. That mandate is the primary basis why we work on a donation bases. Nobody is ever turned away because they haven’t any money. We can then readily make ourselves available to low income communities. Many of the groups we interacted with could not have afforded to pay the typical sustainability tour to come their community.

While in Dc we were invited to Howard University to be a part of their Green Fair. Unfortunately, the Howard experience served to demonstrate how far behind minority communities often are in the move to sustainability. Even at a university of Howard’s prestige recycling has barely moved forward. Howard was the only place where we were not allowed to set up our chickens. Still, our reception was warm. Folks have little information, permaculture was a very new idea that most had no exposure to. Like folks everywhere however, folks in DC were eager for information. We became the focus of Howard’s “Green fair.” The questions folks asked seemed mundane on one level but in fact were just the type of questions the sustainability movement must answer if we are to truly reach out, how do we live, where do we cook and sleep, what do we do for entertainment, and how do we go to the restroom. At Howard and at the other presentations we offered to the minority communities of DC, folks wanted to know how we lived the way we did. Many of the answers challenged the sensitivities of some very mainstream folks.

We also took the bus to Roger Moore School where the bus and chickens were swamped large groups of excited elementary school kids. Even at a very young age the kid’s questions focused on how we live. At Teddy Roosevelt High School the turn out was low but the kids who did come to see the bus wanted as well to know how we lived. At All Nations Baptist Church there were more questions about how we lived. Folks are surprised to see that in many ways we live no differently than they do. Our lifestyle is simply predicated on sustainability. It has become clear to me that the sustainability and permaculture movements must work hard to make sure what we teach always addresses the most important issues. How do we cook, rest, entertain, stay clean and relive ourselves is all more important than philosophies or gadgets. In low income community’s folks must see change that they not only must make but also can make. I also learned in DC that we are fulfilling well our work of bringing permaculture to everybody.

We presented at other places as well in Dc including American University and a NVDA training at the University of Maryland. We also brought the bus to the GLUT Food Coop’s 40th anniversary. Another engaging presentation came at Transition Greenbelt. Greenbelt is a community of 20,000 built by the federal government back in the 1940’s. Its citizens have joined the world wide transitional movement to ensure community members guide their communities into the new low energy dependence age. In Greenbelt a large group of folks took part in a discussion based on one pertinent question, can permaculture designed transition feed the folks of Greenbelt. In other words, can permaculture deliver on its enormous potential? I think the answer is yes, we left the folks of Greenbelt feeling the same way.

After Dc we finished up the tour in Ashville, North Carolina. In Ashville we met the GO, Green Opportunities folks. GO comes out of a local “weed and seed” program. I’m not a big fan of “weed and seed” but these folks have been able to organize effectively enough to have seen some of the “seed” part of the program. I presented before some 15 older inner city kids all working to keep and build their very challenged community. We talked about social permaculture, about their rights, and how to better organize. Hopefully after our break we will be able to return to Ashville and work with the GO kids in more dept. We also gave a small, two day community street medic training at Warren Wilson college then brought the Permibus to its current rest on Elizabeth and Debra’s beautiful land in the hills of North Carolina. Delyla and Megan are putting on a well-attended street medic training this weekend in Ashville and then we are done for the year. Our break is much needed and well deserved. We’ll see you again on the road in 2010.


Donate On-line:
Go to: www.permibus.org
Click on: Donate

Donate by Mail:
Make checks payable to:
Delyla Wilson.
Send to :
150 Daly Ave.
Hamilton, MT. 59840


“Via Con Carne”
Captain but not leader,
Stan Wilson
Permi Preacher,
Infrastructure Coordinator
Skills Tour.
permipreacher@gmail.com
www.permibus.org

Oct. 5th, 2009

Closed Loop Systems

Captain's Log,
10/06/09
Long Island, NY.

One of the things we strive for in permaculture are closed loop systems. In a closed loop system the waste of one entity becomes the food of another. An example of this is our grey water system. Our system is very simple. We use a typical plastic storage tub that can be purchased at any department store. We have plumbed our kitchen sink which is our sole source of grey water under the bus and across so that it drops into the tub. We have also set up our tube garden so that when watered its water runs back into the grey water. Watering our garden is a primary function of our system. It is however a teaching tool as well. All, or nearly all, components on the bus of course serve more than one function. In the tub we have ornamental Lava rock. We use Lava rock because it is light weight and has a high surface area. Weight is always a concern on the bus. We also have placed a baffle in the middle of the tub. This is part of an old tub top cut to fit and caulked in place. We have also put some toy soldiers in the tub because they are fun.

The trick with gray water is to create residents time. The baffle keeps the water from sloshing back and forth. It must sink below the baffle to get to the other side. The rock provides a large surface area to cling the water. We have also introduced pond scum which contain micro-organism that eat waste. Once the water has reached a high enough level that it needs to be bled off it has been cleaned sufficiently for re-use. Because of how the system is plumbed the water is always re-cleaned and re-used.

The closed loop goes even further because it involves everything that lives on the bus. When we cook we not only create dirty dishes which are washed thus creating gray water, we also create food waste. That waste goes to feed both our chickens and our worms. The chickens provide us with eggs and serve as a teaching tool. The worms not only create compost but also create the worm castings we use combined with our gray water to feed our garden thus creating more food waste. Our dogs are also a part of the system. Because we have dogs we do not have a grease trap. The dogs serve that purpose. They pre-wash our plates removing grease which can be a challenge to deal with in a low water forum and that feeds the dogs calories we don't have to purchase which saves money. Money saved on dog food can go to other things. Our Aussie dog Sage helps keep watch on the chickens and herds them as we. She too stacks functions. Poco is 17, she is however very popular with kids and many others who are amazed that such and old dog is doing so well.

On a social level our permaculture and activist trainings all come together to create another closed loop. We live in an age where any attempts by citizens to gain independence from the corporate state is seen as a threat. In the last years food co-ops have been shut down as have Farmer's Markets. Once was viewed as quaint by the corporate state is now seen as a threat to the noose that has been placed around a free people's necks. Using a "threat" of disease coming into the country and spreading disease the government has passed the National Animal Identification System which does little to prevent a problem created by corporations which import all of the animals that come into the country but does create cost and compliance nightmares that small, local producers will be eliminated by. Google NAIS and see for yourself just how far the government, our government, is willing to go to protect giant corporations from consumer independence. AS long as we must beg corporations to provide our food, water, health, and education needs, we are slaves.

So, how do we use permaculture to create a social closed loop? We can use permaculture tools to grow good food, to provide clean water, and to build strong, vibrant communities of abundance. But, then we must defend them. If we don't the corp/state will simply use more and more oppressive legislation and its every growing security system to crush isolated, unprepared communities of abundance. Using the tools of social permaculture the Skills Tour teaches the skills needed to defend ourselves and our communities from Empire. Empire, wrapped in a flag and a designer label, is what we are dealing with. In order to survive, in fact to thrive, we must learn to use all the tools we have and the tools we can create in order to build and then defend our independence.

From grey water systems to non violent direct action. let all our knowledge, guile, and heart combine as one to create the closed loop of true freedom.



Donate On-line:
Go to: www.permibus.org
Click on: Donate

Donate by Mail:
Make checks payable to:
Delyla Wilson.
Send to :
150 Daly Ave.
Hamilton, MT. 59840


Captain, but not Leader,
Stan Wilson
Infrastructure Coordinator
Skills Tour
permipreacher@gmail.com
www.permibus.org
“Small wheels turn by the
flywheel and rod, big wheel
turns by the grace of God(dess)…”

Sep. 18th, 2009

Weekend Madness/Prepping for Pittsburgh

Good god almighty, which way do I steer? This past weekend was a phenomena oof double booking. While as of last Tuesday the Permibus was leaving Oberlin, less than 200miles from Pittsburgh, we have since made it 400miles away to New York.

Tuesday evening I was delighted to spend a delicious meal and even more delicious company with Gloria, the witch in the woods. This allowed for a less strenuous journey North and Wednesday morning we were off once again. Many miles and errand later we made it to the newly expanded Bread & Roses collective property in Syracuse, NY. My folks did a preoperational tour of the water needs and potential of the land for the Water Management workshop Zay (our hostess) and Stan were to be teaching on Saturday. We enjoyed a lovely root based dinner with Zay after Lorca and I packed our weekend needs and then off again we were to park in the dark at the Ithaca, NY you-pick farm where the Street Medic Training Delyla and I started co-training Thursday morning.

From 9-6pm Thursday and Friday, and 12-4pm Saturday was all about the medicine. I found myself listening to the material and teaching even more of it ad becoming increasingly excited about the prospects of doing health care work in Pittsburgh. The group we taught was small and less dedicated than many but we did our best. On guy in particular payed close attention, asked many questions, and gave a damn decent eyeflush. Lorca, Delyla and I all spent Friday night at a collective house in Ithaca, NY with several of the students and got to see an interesting documentary about the history of street medics in particular Doc and a woman whose name I can’t remember who seemed really hard core and funny.

Some delicious chilli and much needed sleep later it was the last day of training meaning lots of medic role plays which meant in this case I got to throw apple towards the “cop”, have a seizure, and be a “cop”. All fun and games and nobody lost an eye so we mark it down as a win. Then we were glad to get a ride back to Syracuse and our comfy bus home. Happy joyous relief sigh!

The next morn brought with it an open bus tours day as part of the Wescott Street Fair and Rain Water Catchments Barrel Creation Workshop/Rain Water Catchments Barrel Sale. I managed to slip coming out of the bus and banged up my ankle. It bent outwards on the right side and the bruising developed on the inner ankle so ma feared I’d landed myself a broken bone just before the protests. So I spent the better part of the day lying on my back with my foot in the air, icing regularly, applying Arnica oil, and compressing it with an ace.

After a delicious dinner with the Bread and Roses community Kanat (a fabulous salsa dancer and student who lives there) was kind enough to find me crutches and help me down the hill to the bus. What my injured foot earned me was a trip to the hospital for X-Rays on our pre-Pittsburgh day of rest. Kanat once again came in sweetly and drove us all to the ER, chilled in the waiting room for the several hours we were there, and even took us to a store for ice cream on the way home. Hugs to Kanat for being so lovely!

The good news is that nothing is broken so I needn’t be quite as careful in the short term. The bad news is that because its several torn ligaments on the inside of my foot it will have a much harder time ever fully healing and I will be forever prone to spraining that ankle. I will still get to be out in Pittsburgh, though not to the same level as I had hoped. My main goal now it to take care of folks as best I can and as much as possible. I need to work hands on with these skills I know to cement them in me and give room to learn more. This morning was our weekly meeting and tonight or tomorrow morning we leave for PA. We’ve a long week ahead and I just hope I’m ready. The foot thing is throwing me off but I am doing my best to have faith that what I need will come together.

Goddess bless the Pagan Cluster for they made protesting down right comfy and self-care is a vital thing in high-energy, high-stress situations.

Much love too all and blessing all around!
Be well,
-MC

Megan Coyote
Outreach Coordinator
Skills Tour
skillsmc@gmail.com
406-544-2767
www.permibus.org

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